Awards

Student Recognition

November & March

The year-end celebration typically happens at an evening event in the fall of the next school year.
 

Honors: Honors (overall average of 80% or higher: Core Subjects 75% & Non-Core 25%)

Year-End

Honors in Grade 6: given to students who have a high number of outcomes at the Proficient and Exemplary level. Performance on midterm and final exams is also considered.

Award of Excellence in Grade 6: given to students who have achieved an Exemplary level in most subject outcomes. Performance on midterm and final exams is also considered. 

Honors in Grade 7, 8, 9: Overall average of 80% or higher: Core Subjects 75% & Non-Core 25%

Award of Excellence in Grade 7, 8, 9: Overall average of 90% or higher: Core Subjects 75% & Non-Core 25%

Personal Growth Award (one per class): given to students who exhibit overall growth in academics, work ethic, and class participation.

Art Award: given to a student who goes above and beyond in developing his/her art skills.  The student participates well in class, works independently, and takes pride in completing all art projects to the best of his/her ability.  

Music Award: given to a student who works hard to further his/her skills in music. The student participates well and shows leadership in the class. 

Home Ec Award: given to a student who works well individually and with peers. The student is able to complete sewing projects and cooking lessons with minimal teacher intervention, and end products show a high level of skill and precision.

Industrial Arts Award: given to a student who works well individually and with peers. The student is able to complete woodworking projects with minimal teacher intervention and has a year-end project that shows a high level of skill and precision. 

Jubinville-Mathieu French Language Art Award: given to a grade 9 student who has achieved the highest combined average in French Language Arts from grade 7 to 9. 

Jubinville-Mathieu Religion Award: given to a grade 9 student who has achieved the highest combined average in Religion from grades 7 to 9. 

Unsung Student Award: given by the staff to a grade 9 student who is morally upstanding, works to his/her best ability, would stand up for the less fortunate, and has a good heart. 

 

Citizenship Award

  • given by the staff  to a student who demonstrates the following criteria: 

    • is reliable and responsible

    • demonstrates a willingness to help others

    • is involved in school activities

    • has a positive attitude towards others 

    • works to academic potential

    • models good behavior in & out of the classroom

    • promotes the well-being of the school 

Raider Award

  • given to a student by the student population. Students select a class nominee and the student population votes for one of the nominees. The criteria for nominated students includes the following: 

    • is the student friendly to others (students and staff)?

    • is the student responsible and able to carry out tasks promptly and efficiently?

    • is the student able to communicate and work with both students and staff?

    • does the student participate willingly in all aspects of school life?

Grade 6 Highest Academic St. Paul Education Board of Trustees Award: given to the student who has obtained the most outcomes at an Exemplary level in all subjects. Performance on midterms and final exams is also considered.

Grade 9 Highest Academic St. Paul Education Board of Trustees Award: given to the student who has the highest overall academic average in core and non-core subjects. 

NOTE: 

  • Averages are calculated using 75% of the core subjects and 25% of non-core subjects.

  • All cards look the same in terms of shape, size, and color. A card does not have a student’s average on it.

  • Lost or destroyed cards will not be replaced.

  • Students can learn how to calculate their averages by asking a teacher or administrator

Academic Honesty

Learn More

Academic dishonesty is defined as deceitful and/or deceptive attempts to fulfill academic requirements.  It can include:

  • Plagiarism:  The adoption or reproduction of original creations of another author (person, collective, organization, community or other type of author, including anonymous authors) without due acknowledgement.

  • Fabrication:  The falsification of data, information or citations in any formal academic exercise.

  • Deception:  Providing false information to an instructor concerning a formal academic exercise – e.g. giving false excuse for missing a deadline or falsely claiming to have submitted work.

  • Cheating:  Any attempt to give or obtain assistance in a formal academic exercise (like an examination) without due acknowledgement.

  • Bribery:  or paid services.  Giving assignment answers or test answers for money.

  • Sabotage:  Acting to prevent others from completing their work.  This includes cutting pages out of library books or willfully disrupting the experiments of others.

  • Impersonation:  assuming a student’s identity with intent to provide an advantage for the student.

If a student has been academically dishonest in any one subject, the consequence is that the student may be exempt from academic, athletic and citizenship awards at the school and board level for the current school year.  In determining consequences, considerations will include intent, frequency, severity, and restitution.  Unless considered very minor, the Superintendent will be consulted in all cases of academic dishonesty.

Ref: AP 370 Student Awards & Scholarships

Athletic Awards

View Awards

Coaches will acknowledge male and female athletes for each sport in the following areas (exceptions may occur if there is no appropriate candidate for any given award):

  • Most Valuable Player (MVP)
  • Heart Award   
  • Most Improved      
  • Rising Star

The Athlete of the Year will be based on a point system.  For every sport, the coach will choose the top players, based on the following criteria:

 

As an athlete….

  • does the student have a positive attitude towards their teammates and coaches both on and off the court?
  • does the student attend all practices/games/tournaments?  Are they committed? 
  • does the student academically work to the BEST OF THEIR ABILITY?
  • is the student a positive role model both in and out of school?
  • is the student an ambassador for the school?
  • does the student have a good work ethic and a willingness to improve in that particular sport?
  • is the student “coachable” (does he/she try to execute what the coach would like done)?

The athlete with the highest total number of points at the end of the school year will be the Athlete of the Year:

POINT BREAKDOWN: Player #1 will receive 6 points

                                 Player #2 will receive 5 points

                                 Player #3 will receive 4 points

                                 Player #4 will receive 3 points

                                 Player #5 will receive 2 points

                                 Participation receives 1 point 

NOTE:  Volleyball and basketball are on an 11-point system due to the length of the season.

Selection of MVP or Heart Trophy recipients are not within the point system for choosing the Athlete of the Year.  The recipients are chosen upon the discretion of the coach, therefore, the athlete may be an MVP or a Heart Trophy recipient, but not necessarily the Athlete of the Year and vice versa.